Henry, Robert

Institution
University of Saskatchewan
Department
Indigenous Studies
USask Author
On

I-Portal Content

Comparative Analysis of Coloured Gangs in Cape Town and Indigenous Gangs on Canada’s Prairies: Connecting Localized Opposition to Globalized Grievances Through Street Culture

Articles » Scholarly, peer reviewed
Author/Creator
Dariusz Dziewanski
Robert Henry
Critical Criminology , vol. 31, no. 1, 2023, pp. 239 -258
Description

Discusses how discrimination, disenfranchisement, and disempowerment creates the environment that make gangs a enticing option for coloured and Indigenous people in South Africa and Canada.  

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Creating Ethical Research Partnerships – Relational Accountability in Action

Articles » Scholarly, peer reviewed
Author/Creator
Robert Henry
Caroline Tait
Engaged Scholar Journal, vol. 2, no. 1, Engaging with Indigenous Communities, 2016, pp. 183-204
Description
Using research on Saskatoon Indigenous street gangs to examine the relationship between researchers and study participants and how these relationships can be used by researchers to understand their own privilege.
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Manufacturing Compliance with Anti-Indigenous Racism in Canadian Hockey: The Case of Beardy's Blackhawks.

Articles » Scholarly, peer reviewed
Author/Creator
Sam McKegney
Robert Henry
Jordan Koch
Mika Rathwell
Canadian Ethnic Studies Journal, vol. 53, no. 3, Fall, 2021, pp. [29]-50
Description
Examines the numerous external pressures for Indigenous people to refrain from acknowledging racial discrimination within the Canadian hockey system. Also discussed is the role that hockey teams in Indigenous communities, such as the Beardy Blackhawks, can play in reducing the racial factors placed in front of Indigenous players.
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Micro-Reconciliation as a Pathway for Transformative Change

Articles » Scholarly, peer reviewed
Author/Creator
Caroline Lily Tait
William Mussell
Robert Henry
International Journal of Indigenous Health, vol. 14, no. 2, October 31, 2019, pp. 19-38
Description
Authors describe Micro-Reconciliation as “a pervasive and transformative moral refashioning of everyday interpersonal interactions between First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples and Canada’s settler population.” They stress the need for micro-level changes in day-to-day operations to be linked to overall structural reform if they are to be sustainable.
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